Monday, August 16, 2004

City Journal's Heather MacDonald writes a hard hitting piece on the real costs of open borders.

"Debate has recently heated up over whether Mexican immigration—unique in its scale and in other important ways—will defeat the American tradition of assimilation. The rise of underclass behavior among the progeny of Mexicans and other Central Americans must be part of that debate. There may be assimilation going on, but a significant portion of it is assimilation downward to the worst elements of American life......given the magnitude of present immigration levels, if only a portion of those from south of the border goes bad, the costs to society will be enormous."

The article continues,

"Jorge Castaneda, acknowledges the unprecedented character of Hispanic
immigration. “Mexican immigration,” he wrote recently, “does have distinctive traits that do make [assimilation] difficult, if not impossible. This is . . . a matter of history.” That “history” holds that the U.S. robbed Mexico of its natural territory in the nineteenth century, as some Mexican immigrants never seem to forget."

MacDonald goes on to say,

"Immigration optimists, ever ready to trumpet the benefits of today’s
immigration wave, have refused to acknowledge its costs. Foremost among them are skyrocketing gang crime and an expanding underclass. Until the country figures out how to reduce these costs, maintaining the current open-borders regime is folly. We should enforce our immigration laws and select immigrants on skills and likely upward mobility, not success in sneaking across the border.

Read the entire article here.



Wandering Mind

may not be suitable for political vegans